Is a Same-Day Crown Really as Easy as it Sounds?

man exclaiming happiness

A lot of times, when someone is sitting in our dental chair and we discover that a dental crown is needed to repair a damaged tooth, it’s followed by the patient making a groaning sound and a sigh. “That means the goopy impression stuff, right? And I have to wait for the crown to come in, right?”  Well, your Georgetown dental office now offers same-day crowns, and yes, it really is as easy as it sounds.

No More Goopy Stuff

Instead of doing those old plastic trays of the gaggy, goopy stuff to get an impression of your teeth, we use 3D CAD/CAM technology to create a three dimensional, virtual model of your prepared tooth. You’ll see us holding what looks like a magic wand to your mouth – this is the camera transmitting the imagery into our CEREC software to match the exact specifications of your mouth.

The Milling Machine

Next, a ceramic block is chosen in a color shade that matches your existing teeth, and it goes into our milling machine. The machine then custom mills your crown, similar to a big computerized saw or something you’d see in a manufacturing facility. It’s done within a few minutes, and then we can test it to make sure it’s a proper fit for your bite.

A Crowning Achievement

Once the newly milled crown is ready, all that’s left is to apply anesthesia and bond the new crown to your tooth. There’s no temporary restoration, no waiting for something to come from “the lab” because it’s all done right here —- saving you not only valuable time but also money. These long-lasting restorations can last over 10 years, and there’s no metal or dangerous mercury to worry about (which of course, makes us really happy).

So if you’re sitting at your next appointment at our Georgetown Dental office and find out that you need to have a crown to restore a tooth, don’t sweat it! We’ll have you fixed and on your way in no time. Give us a call today to see if a same-day crown can help your smile become more healthy and confident.

“Is Drinking Wine Bad for My Teeth?”

romantic valentine's dinnerWith February being the month of celebrating love, we’re sure there’s a few of you that will be planning a candlelight dinner with your sweetheart for Valentine’s Day. One question that our Georgetown dental team often hears involves that lovely glass of Syrah or Merlot or Pinot Noir served alongside that beautiful steak…. “Is drinking wine bad for my teeth?” Let’s look at the facts…

All Wines are Acidic

Whether we’re talking white wine, red wine, or a rosé, all wine is highly acidic. Those acids can break down tooth enamel and cause teeth to look dull or yellow. A lack of enamel also leaves the teeth at risk for bacteria and further decay.

What About Organic Wines?

We’re obviously big fans of organic wines here at our Georgetown dental office, since these wines are produced without harmful pesticides, fertilizers, and other chemical compounds that are bad for the environment. BUT, even without those extra chemical additives, organic wines still have the same high acid levels that can affect your protective layer of tooth enamel.

So… Should I Not Drink Wine Anymore?

As long as you’re enjoying your glass of wine safely, responsibly, and in moderation, we’re certainly not going to tell you to banish that bottle down to the cellar. Consider these helpful hints:

  • Swish your mouth with water after drinking a glass of wine. The water will help neutralize some of those acids and wash them away from the surface of your teeth.
  • Don’t brush your teeth immediately after that glass of wine. (YES, we know that sounds weird coming from your dentist). Brushing too soon can actually spread the acids around your mouth more, exposing more teeth to it’s damaging effects.

The bottom line is, your Georgetown dentist wants you to keep an eye on your teeth, and if you do discover some discoloration, whether it’s due to a gambit of grenache or a moderate malbec, we have cosmetic dentistry solutions to get your teeth back to bright white in no time. And of course, we’re always welcoming new patients and would happy to see you no matter what your riesling….. or reason…may be.

Top 10 Habits That Ruin Teeth

woman opening bottle with teethAt our dental office in Georgetown, we like to focus on preventive dental care to ensure the health of our neighbors. This usually means seeing us for regular dental visits at least every six months and following a proper hygiene routine at home. But there are other things you may be doing on a daily basis that are harming your smile and you don’t even know it. In this week’s blog, we’d like to cover the top 10 most common habits that ruin teeth.

Brushing Too HardYour dentist in Georgetown recommends brushing your teeth twice a day using small, gentle circles. If you vigorously scrub away at teeth, you can damage gum tissue and cause it to recede, making teeth super sensitive.

Crunching Ice Cubes – Ice cubes are hard and aren’t meant for crunching. Their tough texture can cause you to break teeth, damage dental restorations, or create tiny chips in the enamel where bacteria can thrive.

Eating LemonsThese bright yellow fruits are packed with acid, and when the acid comes in contact with teeth, it can easily erode enamel.

Biting NailsThe angle your jaw adjusts to while nail biting can cause problems with your jaw, also known as TMJ or TMD. Nail biting may also result in chipped teeth.

Using Teeth as ToolsYour teeth are meant for chewing, not opening packets or holding things. When they are used in this manner, cracked teeth are incredibly common.

Playing Sports without a MouthguardPlaying any sport without a mouthguard isn’t only potential dangerous for your smile, it’s also dangerous for your brain. Mouthguards protect teeth from elbows, hockey pucks, or baseballs and can help minimize the risk of concussions.

Drinking SodaSoft drinks are usually packed with sugar, and as we all know, sugar is terrible for teeth. When sugar is in a liquid format as in soda, it can be even more damaging since it’s being exposed to the entire mouth, usually over a long period of time.

Chewing on PencilsJust like you should use your teeth as tools, you also shouldn’t hold or chew on your writing utensils. Pencils and pens alike are hard and can damage teeth pretty easily.

Smoking or Using TobaccoNot only is tobacco use bad for overall health, it’s also detrimental for oral health. Smoking or chewing tobacco can discolor teeth and has been linked to gum disease and oral cancer.

Clenching or Grinding TeethWhether you clench or grind out of stress or while you sleep, you’re essentially banging your teeth together over and over again. Habitually clenching or grinding can result in broken teeth or jaw problems(TMJ).

If you found yourself identifying with any of the habits above, we would encourage you to work on breaking them. In the meantime, if you happen to damage your teeth, whether from a bad habit or any other reason, we’ll be happy to get you back to smiling. Give our Georgetown dental office a call to schedule an appointment.