Migraine Awareness Month

woman with headacheJune is recognized as National Migraine and Headache Awareness Month and serves to not only educate the population on this debilitating illness, but also to increase funding to advance migraine research and treatment options. While numerous causes can be to blame, our dental office in Georgetown wants to take a closer look at how migraines may be related to dentistry.  

Migraine Facts

Over 39 million Americans are affected by migraines, including 18% of U.S. women, 6% of men, and 10% of children. Migraines are also rarely cured, but rather treated and managed through changes in lifestyle or medications. These treatment methods help help lessen the effects of the common migraine symptoms including, but not limited to:

  • Throbbing or aching pain in the head
  • Sensitivity to light and noise
  • Blurred vision
  • Neck pain
  • Vomiting
  • Nausea

These symptoms are often so severe that many sufferers can’t go to work or complete everyday responsibilities when experiencing a migraine.

How Migraines May Be Related to Dentistry

Many migraines can be triggered by an excess surge in serotonin release caused by stress, certain foods, or bright lights or loud noises. However, more research has been showing a positive correlation between migraines and a poor bite or habitual bruxism (tooth grinding or clenching).

Poor Bite & Migraines

A poor bite is diagnosed when the top and bottom jaws don’t align properly. When this happens, the jaw muscles, neck muscles, and even the muscles in the base of the head experience unnecessary pressure every single time the jaws come together. Since that action is done repeatedly every day, those muscles get tired easily and inhibit the normal blood flow. The result could very well be a migraine.  

Bruxism & Migraines

Bruxism is a condition that causes people to constantly clench their teeth or grind them repeatedly, sometimes while they’re asleep and don’t even realize it’s happening. This repetitive stress on the jaw muscles can lead to headaches or migraines.

If you suffer from migraines or unexplainable headaches in the morning, you may have a poor bite or clench your teeth at night. But you don’t need to continue to live in pain or without answers. Start your search towards relief by calling our Georgetown dental office today. We can check for signs of bruxism and TMJ and recommend the best treatment options for you.  

What’s the Big Deal About Metal Fillings?

woman asking whyYou may have seen us mention the danger of metal fillings (we call them amalgam fillings) in our social media posts or even heard us mention it during an exam at your Georgetown dental office. Even though our office is GreenDoc Gold-Certified, believe it or not, the environment isn’t the only thing that we’re trying to protect by not using metal fillings. We’re also worried about your overall health.

What exactly is in an amalgam filling?

The mixture that is used in metal fillings is made up of liquid mercury and a powdered alloy mix of silver, copper, and tin. About 50% or so of the total mixture is mercury, and when that liquid mercury reacts chemically with the powdered items, it binds all those particles together to form an amalgam (hence the name).

Liquid Mercury — like in old thermometers?

YES, exactly right. Most newer non-digital thermometers use alcohol or another non-toxic substance in them, but those older ones that you remember, perhaps from your childhood, contain about .61 grams of mercury. If you break one of those thermometers, or otherwise accidentally spill liquid mercury, it rolls itself into a sphere shape (like a ball-bearing) and requires hazardous materials training to clean it up. You also have to contact the local health department to dispose of the mess, and keep people and animals out of the area for at least 24 hours. No, we’re not kidding.

YIKES. So that’s why it’s bad for my health?

That’s only one reason it’s bad for your overall health. Mercury can also leech out of amalgam fillings in the form of a vapor as it gets older and wears down. People who are more sensitive, like children or people with existing health problems can develop what’s called “mercury poisoning” from the toxins being released into their bodies. Women and mothers who are breastfeeding are especially susceptible to it’s effects. In fact, the UK, Canada, and Australia have all banned the use of amalgam fillings in pregnant women.

So, what do I do?

Your dentist in Georgetown only uses ceramic and tooth-colored composite materials for dental fillings…. NEVER amalgam. If you have existing amalgam fillings that may be old or damaged, talk to us about replacing those fillings with safer composite materials. We use a special amalgam separator during the removal process to be sure that none of that toxic material enters our water supply, which is a whole other realm of environmental danger that we addressed in a previous blog.

At Trade Winds Dental, we’re concerned with not only your oral health, but also your overall health today and well into the future. Call us today to schedule an appointment.

Is a Same-Day Crown Really as Easy as it Sounds?

man exclaiming happiness

A lot of times, when someone is sitting in our dental chair and we discover that a dental crown is needed to repair a damaged tooth, it’s followed by the patient making a groaning sound and a sigh. “That means the goopy impression stuff, right? And I have to wait for the crown to come in, right?”  Well, your Georgetown dental office now offers same-day crowns, and yes, it really is as easy as it sounds.

No More Goopy Stuff

Instead of doing those old plastic trays of the gaggy, goopy stuff to get an impression of your teeth, we use 3D CAD/CAM technology to create a three dimensional, virtual model of your prepared tooth. You’ll see us holding what looks like a magic wand to your mouth – this is the camera transmitting the imagery into our CEREC software to match the exact specifications of your mouth.

The Milling Machine

Next, a ceramic block is chosen in a color shade that matches your existing teeth, and it goes into our milling machine. The machine then custom mills your crown, similar to a big computerized saw or something you’d see in a manufacturing facility. It’s done within a few minutes, and then we can test it to make sure it’s a proper fit for your bite.

A Crowning Achievement

Once the newly milled crown is ready, all that’s left is to apply anesthesia and bond the new crown to your tooth. There’s no temporary restoration, no waiting for something to come from “the lab” because it’s all done right here —- saving you not only valuable time but also money. These long-lasting restorations can last over 10 years, and there’s no metal or dangerous mercury to worry about (which of course, makes us really happy).

So if you’re sitting at your next appointment at our Georgetown Dental office and find out that you need to have a crown to restore a tooth, don’t sweat it! We’ll have you fixed and on your way in no time. Give us a call today to see if a same-day crown can help your smile become more healthy and confident.

National Women’s Health Week

Iwomen cyclingn just a few days we’ll celebrate National Women’s Health Week which kicks off appropriately on Mother’s Day, May 13th. This seven day celebration serves to raise awareness of the importance of following healthy habits for women of all ages. At our dental office in Georgetown, we know that dental health is an important part of overall health, and there are certain areas of oral health that specifically affect women throughout different phases of life.

Women’s Oral Health Priorities Change Over Time

As bodies change, chemistry throughout the body tends to change too. This includes the mouth. Since women experience hormonal changes at various times in their life, they actually have more oral health concerns to worry about, particularly during puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause.

Puberty

Typically puberty in girls begins between 8 and 14 years old. Girls will experience quite a transformation during this time since a lot is happening inside their bodies. Hormone levels fluctuate and these hormones, including estrogen and progesterone, can affect oral health. Both estrogen and progesterone increase blood flow to the gums which may cause them to become inflamed, red, and sore. Bacteria in the mouth can also build up easier, increasing the risk for cavities and gum disease.

Menstruation

Just as during puberty, hormone levels continue to ebb and flow throughout a women’s childbearing years. Gums may still become sore or perhaps bleed when brushing or flossing close to when a period is about to begin. Some women may even experience a canker sore during this time. During menstruation, it’s also common to experience a decrease in saliva production, which will make a mouth feel dry and can potentially cause the breath to smell bad.

Pregnancy

Another time in a woman’s life when hormones and dental health changes is during pregnancy. Since about half of all pregnant women will get pregnancy gingivitis, dental care is especially important. What’s more is that poor dental health during pregnancy has been associated with premature babies, gestational diabetes, and preeclampsia. It’s recommended that pregnant women visit their dentist in Georgetown during the second trimester.

Menopause

During menopause women’s estrogen levels drop… which is directly related to bone loss. Women who have gone through menopause are aware of the risks associated with bone loss and are most commonly concerned with osteoporosis. While osteoporosis leads to brittle bones, it can also decrease bone density in the jaw increasing the risk of tooth loss. There are several ways dentists can replace these lost or damaged teeth, including dental implants and dentures.

Our Georgetown dental office is here to care for all of our patients during every stage of life. If you’re experiencing changes in your oral health, or if it’s been awhile since you’ve seen a dentist, there’s no better time than now to schedule an appointment. Give us a call today!

Tasty Treats that are also Good for Teeth

applesIt’s Spring! FINALLY! The staff at our Georgetown dental office is excited to get outside and get active with family and friends. We’re also thinking about eating healthier and lighter, and shaking off the heavy comfort food that we indulged in all winter long. We wanted to tell you about some healthy snacking ideas for spring that are not only tasty, they’re also good for your teeth!

Cheese Please!

Cheese is a great, healthy snack for kids and adults because of all the vitamins, minerals, and nutrients inside, including calcium for strong tooth enamel. But that’s not all…. Chewing on a piece of cheese also increase the saliva in your mouth, keeping bad bacteria and sugars from lingering on your tooth surfaces.

An Apple A Day

Apples are great for your teeth because eating them also increases the saliva in your mouth. Not only that, the rough texture of apples stimulates your gums as it lightly scrubs against your teeth. (Apples are also full of fiber, which is great for your overall health.)

Almonds and Sunflower Seeds

Nuts like almonds and seeds like those from our happy sunflowers are a great source of protein and calcium while still being really low in sugar. Maybe try some in homemade hummus! (YUM!)

Low-Fat Yogurt

You’ve probably heard those commercials for yogurts with probiotics in them that are so good for your tummy. Well guess what? All that good bacteria is great for your gums, blocking out the bad bacteria that can lead to cavities.

If you’re getting hungry, consider going to one of the three local Farmers Markets here in Georgetown to stock up on those healthy snacks!

On Thursdays from 2:30-5:30 p.m., visit The Farmers Market in the Republic Shopping Center at 900 N. Austin Ave. The Sun City Farmers Market is every Tuesday, 9 a.m. till Noon at 2 Texas Drive, and the Wolf Ranch Farmers Market is every Saturday, 9 a.m. till 1 p.m. in the parking lot of the Wolf Ranch Shopping Center.

Your Georgetown dental office is full of great ideas for healthy snacks that are also great for your oral health. Ask us about it at your next appointment!

5 Important Facts About Oral Cancer

oral cancer awareness

April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month, and all month long is dedicated to educating the public on the seriousness of the disease. At our dental office in Georgetown, we’d like to help our community by discussing some current oral cancer statistics, sharing the most common symptoms, and talking about some factors that can put you at increased risk.

Oral Cancer Cases Continue to Grow in America

According to the American Cancer Society, just over 51,500 people in the United States will be diagnosed with oral cancer this year alone. That’s an increase of over 1,750 from 2017.

Death Rates Have Remained the Same Over 10 Years

Even though the survival rate for oral cancer is 65%, it still takes the lives of thousands of Americans every year. In 2018, an estimated 10,000 will die. Advancements in treatment options helped reduced the mortality rates in the past, however they have remained steady over the past 10 years.

Catching Oral Cancer Early Can Save Your Life

One of the contributing factors to the 65% oral cancer survival rate is due to early diagnosis and treatment intervention. The best way you can help protect yourself is by recognizing the signs of oral cancer and seeing your dentist in Georgetown as soon as possible if notice any of the common symptoms including:

  • A sore in the mouth that doesn’t go away and bleeds easily
  • A chronic white or red area
  • Difficulty swallowing, chewing, or moving the tongue
  • A lump on the cheek, tongue, or throat
  • Coughing up blood
  • Ear pain

Tobacco Use Increases the Risk of Oral Cancer

It’s a well known fact that smoking causes lung cancer, but it can also cause other types of cancer including oral cancer. In fact, 80% of those who have oral cancer smoke or use other forms of tobacco. Quitting can help reduce your risk.

So Does Drinking Alcohol Excessively

Approximately 70% of all those diagnosed with oral cancer consume alcohol heavily. And if someone both drinks excessively and smokes, their risk for oral cancer may be as high as 100%.

Prevention

Avoiding known risk factors such as smoking and drinking too much alcohol can certainly help lower your chances of developing oral cancer. However, there are other factors that we can’t control. For example, men are two times more likely to develop oral cancer than women and those over the age of 55 are most commonly affected by the disease. While we can’t do much to change those risks, we can do our best to protect ourselves by practicing good oral hygiene and maintaining dental checkups every six months. These appointments can help in catching oral cancer early when chances of successful treatment and survival are highest.

We welcome all of our neighbors to call our Georgetown dental office to schedule an appointment with us. We’re here to keep your smile, and your whole body, healthy.

4 Things You Need to Know About Calcium

foods with calicumWhen most people think of calcium, they often associate it with building super strong bones. While that’s certainly part of its benefits, the team at our dental office in Georgetown also knows that calcium is crucial for a strong smile, too. But before you start diving in to a calcium-rich diet, consider some important facts to keep your body, and mouth, healthy.

Know How Much Calcium You Need

Your recommended level of calcium intake depends on your age and your gender. The following chart from the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) shows just how much calcium each age group needs each and every day.

  • 0-6 months = 200 mg for both males and females
  • 7-12 months = 260 mg for both males and females
  • 1-3 years = 700 mg for both males and females
  • 4-8 years = 1,000 mg for both males and females
  • 9-18 years = 1,300 mg for both males and females
  • 19-50 years = 1,000 mg for both males and females
  • 51-70 years = 1,000 mg for males, 1,200 mg for females
  • 71+ years = 1,200 mg for both males and females

Too Much Calcium Is a Real Thing

While you should always try your best to get your recommended daily intake of calcium, there’s no need to go overboard. In fact, your Georgetown dentist wants you to know that ingesting too much calcium can have adverse effects on your oral and overall health. Excess calcium can lead to gum disease, plaque deposits, and has even been studied to potentially increase the risk for heart disease. Just like most things in life, calcium is best in moderation. Make sure to follow the recommended amount for your age and gender.  

Mix in Some Vitamin D

Even if you’re getting your recommended intake of calcium daily, it may not be enough to keep your bones and teeth strong. In order for calcium to be absorbed into the body properly, it needs an adequate amount of vitamin D, too. Your body needs both vitamin D and calcium to function, so read the nutrition labels on your food and provide yourself with a nice mix of the two.

Look Past the Dairy Aisle

The most common way to get calcium is to eat or drink dairy products such as yogurt, milk, and cheese. And while those are excellent sources of calcium, and usually vitamin D too, there are plenty of other non-dairy options to explore including:

  • Sardines
  • Salmon
  • Soymilk
  • Orange juice
  • Calcium-fortified cereal

Our Georgetown dental office strives to keep our patients as healthy as possible, and not just their smiles. That’s why we encourage each and every one of them to eat well balanced meals and get enough calcium and vitamin D. That, along with maintaining bi-annual dental visits and brushing and flossing regularly, will help keep their smiles and bodies strong, for life.

Super Simple Ways that YOU Can Be Greener

quote by Jean Paul RichterAt our Georgetown dental office, we’re a little extreme about being green. Not only are we one of less than 10 dentists in Texas who are members of the Eco-Dentistry Association, our office one of only four who have achieved GreenDOC Gold Certification for our environmental efforts.

You may look at all of the things we do in our office and think, “Wow, I can’t really do anything to help the environment like THEY do.” But we wanted to assure you that there are TONS of things that you can do at home and at work to help the environment.

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle!

Recycling is one of the easiest things that you can do to help save the environment.

  • Drop those empty cans and bottles into the recycling bin at work instead of in with your trash. Encourage your coworkers to do the same by working on your jump shot!
  • Gather up your newspapers and take them to a recycling drop-off once a month.
  • Use cloth napkins at the dinner table instead of paper towels. (Fun tip! Use colorful bandanas instead!)
  • Use cloth shopping bags instead of plastic when you go for groceries. (They’re also stronger and won’t hurt your fingers when you carry a ton of bags inside the house.)

Ok, What Else Can You Do?

Once you get in the habit of recycling, add in another good habit to help save the planet. Some suggestions from our Georgetown dental team include:

  • Turn off the tap when you’re brushing your teeth! Letting it just sit there and run wastes almost 90 glasses of water per day.
  • Switch regular light-bulbs out for energy-efficient LED bulbs.
  • Buy a plant! Did you notice that we have green plants at our office? They’re not just for looks….. They help to clean the air and provide a soothing environment.

One Last Thing…

Putting these simple tips into practice will not only help save the environment…. They may also save you money! You may lower your trash bill without all of those recyclables in there, and those light bulbs will save you money on your electric bills.

For more ideas on how to live greener, ask us about it at your next dental appointment. SEE – it IS easy being green!

How Your Oral Health Can Affect Your Heart

heart health monthFebruary is nationally recognized as Heart Health Month. Every year the American Heart Association and medical professionals across the country join together to publicize the seriousness of heart disease and educate the population on how to reduce your risk. At our dental office in Georgetown, we want to help do our part and bring awareness to how your oral health is directly linked to your heart health.  

The Oral Health, Heart Health Connection

It’s been said that your eyes are the window to the soul. While that may be true, another phrase we should be promoting is that your mouth is the window to your overall health. Throughout the years, researchers have discovered a strong correlation between oral health and overall health, including its link to heart disease.

It’s All About the Gums

When you come to see your dentist in Georgetown, your dental team is looking at more than just your teeth. We’re also taking an incredibly close look at the health of your gums. Your gums play an important role not only in your oral health and keeping your teeth in place, but also in the health of your heart. If gum disease is present and left untreated, the infection can transfer into the bloodstream. When this happens, your body responds by producing more C-reactive protein (CRP). Higher than normal levels of CRP can cause some serious health issues including:

  • Inflamed arteries
  • Blood clots
  • Heart attacks
  • Strokes

Signs of Gum Disease

Since gum disease can develop quickly, it’s important to be aware of the most common signs so that you can get it treated immediately. Early intervention is the key to a easier and more successful treatment. If you notice any of the signs below, contact your Georgetown dentist as soon as possible.

  • Bleeding when brushing or flossing
  • Puffy, tender gums
  • Bad breath
  • Loose teeth

Protect Your Gums, Protect Your Heart

Prevention of gum disease is one way you can help reduce your risk of heart disease. Make sure you brush your teeth, floss every day, and maintain visits to our Georgetown dental office at least twice a year. These bi-annual appointments help remove buildup on teeth that, if left alone, could develop into gum disease or other oral health problems.

Don’t put yourself at risk to the seriousness of heart disease. Schedule an appointment with us today.

“Is Drinking Wine Bad for My Teeth?”

romantic valentine's dinnerWith February being the month of celebrating love, we’re sure there’s a few of you that will be planning a candlelight dinner with your sweetheart for Valentine’s Day. One question that our Georgetown dental team often hears involves that lovely glass of Syrah or Merlot or Pinot Noir served alongside that beautiful steak…. “Is drinking wine bad for my teeth?” Let’s look at the facts…

All Wines are Acidic

Whether we’re talking white wine, red wine, or a rosé, all wine is highly acidic. Those acids can break down tooth enamel and cause teeth to look dull or yellow. A lack of enamel also leaves the teeth at risk for bacteria and further decay.

What About Organic Wines?

We’re obviously big fans of organic wines here at our Georgetown dental office, since these wines are produced without harmful pesticides, fertilizers, and other chemical compounds that are bad for the environment. BUT, even without those extra chemical additives, organic wines still have the same high acid levels that can affect your protective layer of tooth enamel.

So… Should I Not Drink Wine Anymore?

As long as you’re enjoying your glass of wine safely, responsibly, and in moderation, we’re certainly not going to tell you to banish that bottle down to the cellar. Consider these helpful hints:

  • Swish your mouth with water after drinking a glass of wine. The water will help neutralize some of those acids and wash them away from the surface of your teeth.
  • Don’t brush your teeth immediately after that glass of wine. (YES, we know that sounds weird coming from your dentist). Brushing too soon can actually spread the acids around your mouth more, exposing more teeth to it’s damaging effects.

The bottom line is, your Georgetown dentist wants you to keep an eye on your teeth, and if you do discover some discoloration, whether it’s due to a gambit of grenache or a moderate malbec, we have cosmetic dentistry solutions to get your teeth back to bright white in no time. And of course, we’re always welcoming new patients and would happy to see you no matter what your riesling….. or reason…may be.