Is a Same-Day Crown Really as Easy as it Sounds?

man exclaiming happiness

A lot of times, when someone is sitting in our dental chair and we discover that a dental crown is needed to repair a damaged tooth, it’s followed by the patient making a groaning sound and a sigh. “That means the goopy impression stuff, right? And I have to wait for the crown to come in, right?”  Well, your Georgetown dental office now offers same-day crowns, and yes, it really is as easy as it sounds.

No More Goopy Stuff

Instead of doing those old plastic trays of the gaggy, goopy stuff to get an impression of your teeth, we use 3D CAD/CAM technology to create a three dimensional, virtual model of your prepared tooth. You’ll see us holding what looks like a magic wand to your mouth – this is the camera transmitting the imagery into our CEREC software to match the exact specifications of your mouth.

The Milling Machine

Next, a ceramic block is chosen in a color shade that matches your existing teeth, and it goes into our milling machine. The machine then custom mills your crown, similar to a big computerized saw or something you’d see in a manufacturing facility. It’s done within a few minutes, and then we can test it to make sure it’s a proper fit for your bite.

A Crowning Achievement

Once the newly milled crown is ready, all that’s left is to apply anesthesia and bond the new crown to your tooth. There’s no temporary restoration, no waiting for something to come from “the lab” because it’s all done right here —- saving you not only valuable time but also money. These long-lasting restorations can last over 10 years, and there’s no metal or dangerous mercury to worry about (which of course, makes us really happy).

So if you’re sitting at your next appointment at our Georgetown Dental office and find out that you need to have a crown to restore a tooth, don’t sweat it! We’ll have you fixed and on your way in no time. Give us a call today to see if a same-day crown can help your smile become more healthy and confident.

National Women’s Health Week

Iwomen cyclingn just a few days we’ll celebrate National Women’s Health Week which kicks off appropriately on Mother’s Day, May 13th. This seven day celebration serves to raise awareness of the importance of following healthy habits for women of all ages. At our dental office in Georgetown, we know that dental health is an important part of overall health, and there are certain areas of oral health that specifically affect women throughout different phases of life.

Women’s Oral Health Priorities Change Over Time

As bodies change, chemistry throughout the body tends to change too. This includes the mouth. Since women experience hormonal changes at various times in their life, they actually have more oral health concerns to worry about, particularly during puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause.

Puberty

Typically puberty in girls begins between 8 and 14 years old. Girls will experience quite a transformation during this time since a lot is happening inside their bodies. Hormone levels fluctuate and these hormones, including estrogen and progesterone, can affect oral health. Both estrogen and progesterone increase blood flow to the gums which may cause them to become inflamed, red, and sore. Bacteria in the mouth can also build up easier, increasing the risk for cavities and gum disease.

Menstruation

Just as during puberty, hormone levels continue to ebb and flow throughout a women’s childbearing years. Gums may still become sore or perhaps bleed when brushing or flossing close to when a period is about to begin. Some women may even experience a canker sore during this time. During menstruation, it’s also common to experience a decrease in saliva production, which will make a mouth feel dry and can potentially cause the breath to smell bad.

Pregnancy

Another time in a woman’s life when hormones and dental health changes is during pregnancy. Since about half of all pregnant women will get pregnancy gingivitis, dental care is especially important. What’s more is that poor dental health during pregnancy has been associated with premature babies, gestational diabetes, and preeclampsia. It’s recommended that pregnant women visit their dentist in Georgetown during the second trimester.

Menopause

During menopause women’s estrogen levels drop… which is directly related to bone loss. Women who have gone through menopause are aware of the risks associated with bone loss and are most commonly concerned with osteoporosis. While osteoporosis leads to brittle bones, it can also decrease bone density in the jaw increasing the risk of tooth loss. There are several ways dentists can replace these lost or damaged teeth, including dental implants and dentures.

Our Georgetown dental office is here to care for all of our patients during every stage of life. If you’re experiencing changes in your oral health, or if it’s been awhile since you’ve seen a dentist, there’s no better time than now to schedule an appointment. Give us a call today!