Join Us in the Fight Against Breast Cancer

As many of you are aware, our beloved hygienist and dear friend, Shermance, is fighting an incredible battle against breast cancer. Supporting her and helping her in every way that we can is our heart’s mandate because we cherish her so deeply. We also know that none of us have to look very far to see how close to home the fight against breast cancer really is. Maybe it was a family member, someone very close to your heart, or even yourself… Experiencing and witnessing the devastating effects of breast cancer are far too common occurrences.

That’s why we’ve created a team called “The Balled and the Beautiful” to participate in the 14th Annual Susan G. Komen Austin Race for the Cure® event. About a month ago, Xenia Hennington, the team’s captain, and Dr. Hennington asked if you would support their decision to fight breast cancer. On behalf of Shermance, The Balled and the Beautiful, and the loved ones whom you’ve fought with against this terrible disease, we are asking you once more for your support!

75 percent of the money we raise will be put to work right here in Bastrop, Caldwell, Hays, Travis and Williamson counties to improve the lives of everyone affected by this deadly disease. The remaining funds go to national research to find a cure for breast cancer once and for all.

Below, you’ll find a list of individual team members to whom you can donate money to, as well as, the team’s page.
Thank you for taking the time to read this message and for your love, understanding, and support in the myriad of ways that you express it.

To donate to the entire team, click here!
To donate to an individual team member, please click on his or her name below!

Shermance Morris, RDH
Alanna Gail
David Hennington, DDS
Xenia Hennington

In humble gratitude,
All of Us at Trade Winds Dental

Take the Pledge!

Well, our Save-90-a-Day campaign has been cruisin’ along, and to date, 62 of our amazing patients have taken the pledge to help save water and entered for a chance to win a Kindle Fire!

Pretty cool, huh? So what are you waiting for? Head over to our Save-90-a-Day page and take the pledge with your fellow patients! Not only will you be saving 90 glasses of water a day, you’ll also be automatically entered in to win a brand new Kindle Fire!

As always, we’re proud to be YOUR trusted green dentist, and we’re excited to be working with you to make our planet a better place!

Foods That Can Harm Enamel

Many people who are careful about brushing and flossing their teeth wonder how they still end up with cavities or tooth decay. Several factors affect wear and tear on tooth enamel. Diet is a major factor, with certain foods increasing the likelihood that your enamel will become discolored or decayed. Pay close attention to the foods you eat to keep your pearly whites looking healthy and clean.

What Causes Enamel Damage?

Tooth enamel refers to the hard, semi-translucent, whitish part of the tooth that shows above your gums. The enamel is primarily composed of minerals that are strong but susceptible to highly acidic foods. When acid reacts with the minerals in enamel, tooth decay results. Strongly pigmented foods can also damage enamel by discoloring the surface of the tooth.

Foods that Harm Enamel

Acidic foods are the greatest source of enamel damage. To determine whether a food is acidic, look up its pH. Scientists use pH, on a one-to-seven scale, to define the relative acidity or alkalinity of a substance. Foods with low pH levels, between a one and three, are high in acidity and may damage your enamel. Foods with high pH levels, such as a six or seven, are far less likely to cause enamel harm.

So which foods should you avoid? Many fruits are high in acidity, including lemons, grapefruit, strawberries, grapes, and apples. The high sugar and acid content in soda makes it another huge contributor to enamel decay. Moderately acidic foods include pineapple, oranges, tomatoes, cottage cheese, maple syrup, yogurt, raisins, pickles, and honey. The foods that are least likely to cause enamel damage include milk, most cheeses, eggs, and water.

Beverages such as red wine and coffee also damage the enamel by discoloring it. Although stains do not necessarily undermine the integrity of your teeth, they can be unsightly.

What Can I Do to Prevent Enamel Damage?

Fortunately, there are several measures you can take to prevent your enamel from discoloring or decaying. The easiest way to avoid decay is to steer clear of high-acidity foods. This may not always be possible, but eliminating sugary fruit juices and soda from your diet is a good start. Brushing your teeth after each meal and flossing frequently also preserves your enamel. Another good idea is to rinse your mouth with water or mouthwash after eating to wash away high-acidity particles.

Although enamel damage is common, it does not have to be an inevitable occurrence. Knowing the foods that harm your teeth gives you the tools to prevent discoloration and decay. With some easy preventive measures, your teeth will stay strong and white for years to come.

How to Prevent or Get Rid of Gum Disease Naturally

If you have, or are at risk for gum disease (also known as periodontal disease) then you probably know about the traditional treatments that your dentist has to offer. Thanks to advances in technology, there are several options for treatment such as periodontal surgery, laser therapy and other non-surgical methods. However, according to the American Academy of Periodontists, non-surgical methods don’t work for every situation. Also, not everyone is comfortable with these procedures due to possible pain, side effects and medicines that may be used in the process. Fortunately, nature has provided a solution in the form of a naturally occurring substance called xylitol.

Xylitol is a natural sugar found in the fibrous part of many plants including plums, strawberries, raspberries, and birch trees. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center reports that xylitol can reduce unhealthy oral bacteria that are responsible for causing cavities and gum disease. Due to xylitol’s unique structure, it doesn’t break down the way that regular sugar does and it helps keep a neutral pH balance in your mouth. Regular consumption of xylitol will prevent harmful bacteria from sticking to your teeth and gums, thus decreasing your chance of developing, or worsening, gum disease.

Here are some additional benefits that xylitol provides for your oral health:

* Helps to reduce plaque formation
* Helps to reduce the development of cavities and aids in repairing them
* Increases saliva which helps to repair damaged enamel

Preventing Gum Disease
To maintain optimum oral health, a minimum of six grams is necessary to notice the benefits, but more than ten to 12 grams a day is no more effective than 20 grams. To prevent gum disease, make sure that you consume an appropriate amount of xylitol throughout the day in five to six doses, not all at once. Drinking water, with one to two teaspoons of granulated xylitol stirred in, is an effective way to get the recommended amount. Do this in addition to your usual brushing and flossing routine.

Eliminating Gum Disease
Xylitol is anti-bacterial and will help to make the harmful bacteria disappear and over time the pockets that you’ve developed in your gum line will heal and recede back to their normal condition. Since you already have a higher level of bacteria in your mouth, you’ll want to be sure to get in at least ten grams of xylitol each and every day in addition to maintaining a good brushing and mouth rinsing routine. Use a toothpaste with xylitol, a mouthwash that is highly effective at killing bacteria, and floss daily. As your final step, you should drink some water with a few grams of xylitol, chew a piece of gum or eat a candy with xylitol. Make sure that you get your xylitol in small, frequent doses throughout the day in order to gain the most benefit.

Tips and Warnings

* To get enough xylitol, try eating xylitol candies and chewing gum made with 100 percent xylitol or drinking xylitol mixed with water.
* Consuming too much xylitol in a given day, usually more than 20 to 30 grams, often causes diarrhea and stomach discomfort.
* While it’s perfectly safe for human consumption, xylitol is lethal to dogs. Be sure to keep your xylitol in a cupboard or high shelf so that your canine friends can’t get to it.